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Alina Saba Nepal

Why do I care about climate

I was born and raised in an eastern village in Nepal where everything came from nature - food from the farm, fish from the river, fresh milk from the cows... We didn’t have to buy much from the market. Everything was produced locally and we lived a sustainable life. Now my community can no longer grow and produce food in the same way because of erratic rainfall, landslides and rising temperatures. The food production has decreased and no longer meets families’ food needs year round. With little resources and knowledge to combat climate change- whose impacts surpass the community’s traditional knowledge of nature and are beyond their control- global warming has become an issue of survival, and of justice. This story is similar to the stories of many communities in developing countries who have lost their livelihood because of climate change.

 

The ones who own little and live subsistence-based lives in remote villages are the ones who are bearing the greatest burden of climate change. Women are the ones bearing the harshest effects, as climate change reproduces and exacerbates already existing inequalities, in particular gender inequalities. This is injustice! Although my community contributed almost nothing to green house gas emissions we are already struggling to cope with climate change impacts. Yet those most responsible for the climate crisis- industrial countries and big transnational corporations- are denying their historical responsibility and refusing the resultant obligation of taking the lead in addressing the issue. But now is the time. The Paris agreement must be an ambitious and fair agreement that allows the community on the front lines of the impacts of global warming to survive. It’s the time not only for climate action but for climate and gender justice.

Asia Pacific Forum on Women Law and Development (APWLD)

 

Alina Saba, a Limbu Indigenous, was born and raised in an eastern village in Nepal where everything came from nature - food from the farm, fish from the river, fresh milk from the cows... Now her community can no longer grow and produce food in the same way because of erratic rainfall, landslides and rising temperatures. The food production has decreased and no longer meets families’ food needs year round. Therefore, she decided to campaign for climate.

This young woman working with some of the most remote mountainous communities in Nepal was selected to speak on the “Voices from the frontlines panel.” Alina was working in a Mugal community and had to walk for two days just to reach a town with communications capacity when she was selected.